KARIN ZASTROW

blogging about DIRECT LEADERSHIP

Leaders should back off from the personal lives of their staff!

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– a provocative headline, but I love  the underlying message…

First, a few words in Danish, because there is a link to a Danish radio interview:

Ledere skal ikke blande sig i medarbejdernes privatliv!
“Den gode leder er ham eller hende, der kan definere arbejdsopgaverne og få de ansatte til at løse dem bedst muligt. Og så skal lederen i øvrigt blande sig helt udenom medarbejdernes privatliv.” Det mener Anders Raastrup Kristensen som forsker i ledelse og selvledelse

Lyt til DR’s interview med Anders ved at benytte linket nedenfor! (Interviewet med Anders kommer helt i begyndelsen af udsendelsen).

DR P1 morgen 22 feb 2011

And now in a language, all of you understand:

“A good leader  knows how to define the job requirements and tasks – and get his/her employees to solve them in the ideal way. Besides this, the leader should back off from the privacy/personal lives of their staff”, says Anders Raastrup Kristensen, a researcher at Copenhagen Business School. Danish group members can hear the Radio interview with Anders by means of the link below. However, for non-Danes, here’s my translation of Anders’ core message: “Anders further claims that leaders are currently ignoring the ‘core’ of the leadership responsibility, i.e. the work, which must be carried out by each employee or team – in favor of inquiring into ‘how each person feels and is dealing with their work vs their work life balance.”

Leaders, this means, you are required to put all of your competencies into exercising ‘everyday leadership’.¨

Of course, you must also acquire and apply good people skills, but you must use them as a means and not the end of your leadership work.

Do I need to say that I LOVE this message?

This accurately pinpoints and confirms what has been my main driver to write the Direct Leadership book and create the accompanying training programs and materials:

It is not fair – neither to the leaders nor to their staff – to appoint leaders without making it clear to them what  basic, everyday leadership work implies!

Anybody want to help me restore this understanding?

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